12:15 – 13:30 Saturday, 3 September 2011

Luncheon Workshop 1: Live Donor Liver Transplantation for HCC
Chairs: Norihiro Kokudo, MD, PhD (Japan) and Kim Olthoff, MD (USA)

Background:

Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is one potential option for patients suffering from cirrhosis and HCC. The indications and criteria for choosing LDLT or deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) varies across the world. Similarly, there is a lot of disparity in tumour stage that is thought to be acceptable in balancing the risk to the donor. This session will explore the outcomes across the world comparing LDLT and DDLT and how practice varies across the world.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review current outcomes of LDLT for HCC worldwide
  2. Discuss appropriate tumour stage and criteria for using LDLT for patients with HCC
  3. How access to deceased donors affects need for use of LDLT for patients with HCC – comparison of East vs West

Programme Outline:

  1. Results from US A2ALL study
  2. Results from the Japanese national registry
  3. Discuss recommendations from UNOS HCC consensus conference
  4. Discuss recommendations from the Consensus Meeting of 45th Annual Meeting of Japan Society of Hepatology
  5. Discuss recommendations from the Zurich HCC consensus conference

12:15 – 13:30 Saturday, 3 September 2011

Luncheon Workshop 2: Resection vs. Ablation for Small HCC
Chairs: Masatoshi Kudo, MD, PhD (Japan) and Ronnie Poon, MD, PhD (P.R. China)

Background:

Both resection and ablation are categorised in the potentially curative treatment. According to BCLC/AASLD guideline both treatments can be applied for solitary HCC or HCC of <3cm in diameter, <3 nodules in Child A/B patients. However, which treatment is a better option still remains controversial. In this session, Dr. Kudo will present the technique of ablation, nation wide data comparing resection and ablation using data of Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan and Dr. Poon will present surgical data in his institution with overviewing the literature.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Basic technique of RFA
  2. RFA for difficult to treat patients: advanced technique
  3. Resection of small HCC: indication and technical issue
  4. Which is the better choice of treatment, resection or ablation for small HCC?

Programme Outline:

  1. Basic concept and technique of local ablation
  2. Response evaluation criteria for ablation
  3. Advanced technique of difficult-to-treat patient with HCC
  4. Surgical technique
  5. Resection or ablation or transplantation for small HCC

12:15 – 13:30 Saturday, 3 September 2011

Luncheon Workshop 3: Liver Pathology in HCC; Biomarkers and Stratification
Chairs: Irene Ng, MD, PhD (Hong Kong) and Pierre Bedossa, MD, PhD (France)

Background:

There is an urgent need to discover novel factors that can act as biomarkers for prognostic assessment and therapeutic targets of HCC. Both serum and tissue tumour markers are useful in these regards. This is particularly so with the advances of molecular biology and cell signaling in HCC. This workshop will give a review of the recent advances of molecular tissue/serum markers for prognostication in HCC.

Recently, significant benefit has been demonstrated for the kinase inhibitor sorafenib, leading to its approval for palliative HCC therapy. Newer molecular targeted drugs, administered either singly or in combination, are in clinical trials. However, HCC is perhaps the only malignant tumour that does not require mandatory histological examination for establishment of its diagnosis. With the advent of new molecular targeted drugs, it would be important to answer the questions whether certain molecularly defined tumour subgroups show a better or no response. Availability of HCC tissue prior to drug treatment may allow not only confirmation of the diagnosis but also stratification of patients and response prediction.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To have updated knowledge on the histopathology of HCC
  2. To understand the value of biopsies of HCC prior to treatment, particularly molecular targeted therapies
  3. To update on the recent advances of molecular tissue/serum markers for prognostication in HCC
  4. To discuss the value of molecular tissue markers for prediction of response in HCC

Programme Outline:

  1. A talk on ‘Liver biopsy and “standard” histopathology in stratification and prognostication of HCC’
  2. A talk on ‘The molecular tissue/serum markers for prognostication and prediction of response’
  3. Discussion

12:15 – 13:30 Saturday, 3 September 2011

Luncheon Workshop 4: Advanced HCC: Emerging Molecular Therapies
Chairs: Kwang-Hyub Han, MD (Korea) and Richard Finn, MD (USA)

Background:

The approval of sorafenib has validated the concept that molecular targeted therapies can be active in the treatment of advanced HCC. While sorafenib has provided a large step forward, there is still a great need for new treatments for the disease. Currently there are several Phase III studies evaluating new novel therapeutics for this population. In addition, a number of new agents are being evaluated in the setting of sorafenib progression. Still, there are even larger numbers of agents being pursued in single-arm and randomised Phase II studies. Many of these studies are based on some scientific rational to pursue any number of molecular targets. The early closure of the Phase III sunitinib vs sorafenib study was  isappointing and highlights the pitfalls of drug development in HCC. The challenge for us in the future is to understand the molecular drivers in HCC and use this information to better select patients for clinical trials. To date, there have been a number of informative molecular profiling studies done in HCC tissue, yet the true translation of this data to clinical trial design is lacking. In this workshop we will review current olecular therapies in development for HCC and the scientific rationale behind their development. The audience will be enaged to participate and offer insight into the many clinical studies that are ongoing and how the HCC community can work together to better select compounds to move forward into late Phase clinical trials.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the current status of molecular targeted therapy and unmet need in the era of molecular target therapy
  2. Understand the clinical trials landscape in the development of molecular therapies in HCC
  3. Evaluate the scientific rationale behind the pursuit of several of the targets in advanced clinical testing including the VEGF axis, FGFR family, EGFR and mTOR
  4. Appreciate how molecular and clinical heterogeneity is important in patient selection for trials with molecular Therapeutics

Programme Outline:

  1. Welcome, introductions
  2. Current status of molecular target therapy in advanced HCC (or unmet need in the era of molecular target therapy)
  3. Molecular Heterogeneity of HCC and Targets of Interest
  4. Current Clinical Trials of New Agents in HCC
  5. Future directions for advanced HCC
  6. Discussion

12:15 – 13:30 Saturday, 3 September 2011

Luncheon Workshop 5: What Can We Expect from Whole Genome Sequencing of HCC
Chairs: Derek Chiang, MD, PhD (USA) and Jessica Zucman-Rossi, MD, PhD (France)

Background:

Advances in sequencing technologies will enable new frontiers in personalised medicine. As throughput increases to meet the goal of a $1000 genome, these technologies may eventually deliver full genome sequencing of tissue biopsies as a routine clinical test. Thus, it will become crucial to identify genetic vulnerabilities from tumour genomes, as well as to pair molecular therapies that have the highest efficacy against these genetic alterations. Several international consortia have launched genome sequencing efforts to comprehensively identify candidate oncogenes and tumour suppressors in hepatocellular carcinoma. This luncheon workshop will consider how to analyse data emerging from these ongoing sequencing efforts.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To identify the international consortia involved with HCC genome sequencing
  2. To understand statistical metrics for detecting significantly mutated genes

Programme Outline:

  1. Overview of International Cancer Genome Consortium
  2. Statistical analyses of whole genome sequencing
  3. Panel discussion